Jack Crawford heard the rhythm and syntax of his own speech in Graham’s voice. He had heard Graham do that before, with other people. Often in intense conversation Graham took on the other person’s speech patterns. At first, Crawford had thought he was doing it deliberately, that it was a gimmick to get the back-and-forth rhythm going.
Later Crawford realized that Graham did it involuntarily, that sometimes he tried to stop and couldn’t.

freddy newandyke (mr. orange) in primary colors

ericnorseman:

HANNIBAL SEASON 3 NEW CHARACTERS:

"We’re introducing a lot more characters from the novels, some that haven’t been in the series yet," said Fuller. So expect to see Chief Inspector Rinaldo Pazzi [episode 2], the Red Dragon Francis Dolarhyde [episode 8], Mason Verger’s physician Cordell [episode 4] and Lady Murasaki [episode 3], who will “kick all sorts of ass”. (x) & (x)

“At the end, Thorin asks Bilbo to stand with him one last time” — The Hobbit SDCC Liveblog of the TEASER TRAILER (via frodno)

rachreilly:

when someone tries to spill the truth tea but you’re not ready to be scalded

image

mamalaz:

BBC Sherlock in the original Victorian era

The first official posters for all three films

bblackgoldd:

I am so glad I pressed play

howtocatchamonster:

A lot of actors act intelligent, but Philip was the real thing: a shining, artistic polymath with an intelligence that came at you like a pair of headlights and enveloped you from the moment he grabbed your hand, put a huge arm round your neck and shoved a cheek against yours; or if the mood took him, hugged you to him like a big, pudgy schoolboy, then stood and beamed at you while he took stock of the effect.

Philip took vivid stock of everything, all the time. It was painful and exhausting work, and probably in the end his undoing. The world was too bright for him to handle. He had to screw up his eyes or be dazzled to death. Like Chatterton, he went seven times round the moon to your one, and every time he set off, you were never sure he’d come back, which is what I believe somebody said about the German poet Hölderlin: Whenever he left the room, you were afraid you’d seen the last of him. And if that sounds like wisdom after the event, it isn’t. Philip was burning himself out before your eyes. Nobody could live at his pace and stay the course, and in bursts of startling intimacy he needed you to know it.

No actor had ever made quite the impact on me that Philip did at that first encounter: not Richard Burton, not Burt Lancaster or even Alec Guinness. Philip greeted me as if he’d been waiting to meet me all his life, which I suspect was how he greeted everyone. But I’d been waiting to meet Philip for a long time. I reckoned his “Capote” the best single performance I’d seen on screen. But I didn’t dare tell him that, because there’s always a danger with actors, when you tell them how great they were nine years ago, that they demand to know what’s been wrong with their performances ever since.

There was a problem about accents. We had really good German actors who spoke English with a German accent. Collective wisdom dictated, not necessarily wisely, that Philip should do the same. For the first few minutes of listening to him, I thought, “Crikey.” No German I knew spoke English like this. He did a mouth thing, a kind of pout. He seemed to kiss his lines rather than speak them. Then gradually he did what only the greatest actors can do. He made his voice the only authentic one, the lonely one, the odd one out, the one you depended on amid all the others. And every time it left the stage, like the great man himself, you waited for its return with impatience and mounting unease.

We shall wait a long time for another Philip. - John le Carré (X)

meanplastic:

I want to live in Paris Hilton’s $325000 Dog Mansion </3

yass-god:

real acting

sotightandshiny:

It’s a lovely day to cook… My Way

"Respect the chemistry."

wetbiscuitmcglee:

how about the father’s day one?